Speech and Hearing Classes at Rutgers

Hello everybody! Can you believe that it’s September already? The first day of school is just around the corner! As many of you know, Rutgers has a variety of subjects that you can study. Unfortunately, communication sciences and disorders (or SLP for undergraduates), isn’t among these. However, Rutgers does have several interesting courses that are related to the speech and hearing sciences. Many of these courses may even count towards the prerequisite course requirements set out by various SLP graduate programs around the country. With that in mind, and the first day of school fast approaching, today’s post is about the various speech and hearing-related courses that Rutgers has to offer. [Note: course descriptions are taken from their respective department websites].

In The Linguistics Department:
Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech Mechanism
This online only course provides an introduction to the anatomy (structure) and physiology (function) of the systems and processes involved in speech production, with a focus on the respiratory, phonatory, articulatory, resonatory, and nervous systems; covers prerequisite content required for students planning to pursue a higher-level degree in the speech and hearing sciences, including speech pathology and audiology, and emphasizes clinically-relevant information.

Audiology
This online only course serves as an introduction to the profession and practice of audiology through an overview of anatomy and physiology of the auditory system, physical properties of sound relevant to hearing assessment, techniques for hearing assessment, and auditory disorders. Furthermore, it covers the prerequisite content to pursue a higher-level degree in the speech and hearing sciences.

Experimental Methodologies in Language Acquisition
This course is great for those of you interested in language acquisition research. It provides a review of a range of experimental methodologies used by linguists to investigate language acquisition, including an in-depth focus on the linguistic phenomena being acquired by the language learner and coverage of the pioneers responsible for advancing these techniques. Students will gain hands-on experience designing experiments and analyzing data.

Phonetics
This course looks at the articulatory mechanisms of speech, the physical characteristics of speech sounds, and allows students to practice description and transcription of the sounds of the world’s languages. For the 2016-2017 academic year, it will only be offered in the fall semester.

Selected Topics in Linguistics: Intro to Communicative Sciences and Disorders
Selected topics courses are given on an occasional basis,  and treat a special topic of current interest, chosen by the instructor. Lucky for us, the course for Fall 2016 will be focusing on communicative sciences and disorders, and will be taught by a speech-language pathologist.

In The Psychology Department:
Psychology of Language
Psychology of Language is offered in the fall semester, and looks at the production, perception, and acquisition of language at the level of sound (phonology), words (morphology and the lexicon), and grammar (syntax).

Language Acquisition
A companion to Psychology of Language, this course examines the empirical and theoretical studies of the acquisition of syntax, morphology, and phonology; word learning, the neural bases of language acquisition, language disorders, and learnability theory.

As of Fall 2016, these are all of the courses I have found that pertain to speech and hearing at Rutgers. Do you know of any others? Comment below with any courses I may have missed!

For more detailed information about the above courses, including course codes and prerequisites, please refer to this Google Doc: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1cKbzDMo2LOdOJFCX23NHs0m7vwL_qu9xdEECjSRF37w/edit?usp=sharing

P.S. Need a recent syllabus for one of these courses? Check out our syllabi page here: https://ruspeechandhearingclub.wordpress.com/course-syllabi/

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s